This is what INCLUSIVE looks like

In our child care program we have many special children — in fact, they are all special in our eyes. But our children with diverse abilities are extra special because our staff take extra special care to ensure that they are included and active to the best of their abilities. One of our sweet boys is Atticus — he has been a part of our program for over a year and has overcome many challenges during that time.  As he has grown and developed new skills, his peers and friends have grown and developed new skills too. And so have the staff. Last week the staff had a new invention for Atticus to try out.  They knew that Atticus loves balls and to roll things, but is not able to get enough strength and leverage to get things to move as far as he would like. So as a team, they figured out how to make a small ramp that Atticus can use to roll toys – and he was absolutely delighted! But even better, his friends all gathered around to help him and celebrate with him. It was a celebration of staff and children working and playing together, making sure that everyone gets to have fun and celebrate their successes. This is what inclusive looks like. We are so proud of our child care staff and the love and commitment they show to each of our children!

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Safe Home = A Precious Gift

“A safe home is a gift that should never be taken for granted”

This is a truth that so many of the tenants of The Cridge Supportive Transitional Housing know from their own personal experience. Tenants of our housing at Hayward Heights and Mary Cridge Manor have all had experiences of leaving homes that are unsafe; either because a violent individual lives there, or because it is located in a war-torn country. For many of these families and individuals, The Cridge may be the only safe home they have ever known. It is a privilege for us to witness the joy and peace that can come from having a safe home.

Yet, the process of setting up their new homes is a huge task! We are blessed to have wonderful partnerships with Women In Need Society, Bungalow Gift Shop, and Bed, Bath & Beyond who donate household items and furniture for our tenants. The pride that these tenants show in their homes is truly special.

Recently, many of the tenants at Hayward Heights have had the desire to put the same care into the outside of their units as they do to the inside. Two of our staff members, Beata & Marilyn, have started a weekly gardening club where tenants can gather to get inspiration for how to transform their backyards into beautiful and functional spaces. We are fortunate to have many tenants with natural talents in this area, and the group is flourishing.

We know that there are many in this city who are struggling to find a safe home to call their own. We pray often for God to create new opportunities for housing in Victoria. Yet, we know that we have an amazing gift in the safe homes we can offer families at Hayward Heights and Mary Cridge Manor- and we don’t take that for granted!

 Candace Stretch

Man Up: An Article by Deandra Levy

Here are a few excerpts from an excellent article written by Deandra Levy (Detroit Lions) about his observations about sexual assault. Powerful words from a powerful man.

The dehumanization and objectification of women are not issues that are specific to male athletes. They are societal problems. But they tend to be more associated with athletes in part because we are often idolized because of our athletic ability. In many ways, we’re considered models of masculinity, which is at the very root of a lot of these issues. So in honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, I want to use my platform as an NFL linebacker to discuss how we talk about rape and sexual assault — because not enough men are.

When I was a freshman in college, I was completely clueless about the true definition of consent, just as I was completely clueless about most things in the world. My first month of school, I remember hearing stories about wild nights in the dorm. One time I heard a group of guys joke about “running a train” on a drunk girl. At the time, my 18-year-old brain didn’t process this as anything bad. Maybe those guys were just engaging in a display of bravado. But what if what they were describing was true? A decade later, I carry guilt for not acting after hearing a story (and many others) that painted a picture of what I would now identify as rape. This speaks to just how toxic and backward the culture around sexual assault still is. I was 18 years old — “man” enough to drive, vote and go to war — but somehow I didn’t have the courage, or the maturity, to see what they were talking about for what it was: a serious crime.

I was pretty ignorant on this topic for a long time. I think a lot of men are, because it’s often talked about as a women’s issue. The focus always seems to be on teaching young women how not to get raped and on what steps they can take to “stay safe.” But why are we not also focused on educating young men about the definition of consent and what constitutes rape? We’re essentially dealing with the problem by telling women to be more careful.

It’s important for men, especially in a hyper-masculine culture that breeds so many assholes, to stand up and challenge the values that have been passed down to us. This is not just a woman’s problem.

As professional athletes, we have the prominence in our communities to effect real change. When we talk, people listen. So in a sense, our general silence on this issue is condoning it.

So let’s change that. Speak out with me. Man up.

 

The entire article is well worth reading. Click here for the full text.

Spring Break and Butterflies!

by Mandy Wilson

What is Spring Break Camp at The Cridge? It’s two weeks of fun, faith and friendship. It’s going on adventures and trying new things. It’s playing games, making crafts, baking cookies and so much more. It’s waking up each morning filled with excitement as you anticipate the day ahead and going to bed exhausted with a brain full with new memories.

Each morning the children are greeted with a smile as they enter The Cridge child care facility. They are invited to find a favourite toy to play with or book to read. As friends arrive, the energy grows. Soon a leader invites some children to come outside to play on our playground. At 9:30 everyone gathers and the day truly begins. After a healthy snack from home, the children prepare to go on an out trip such as to Butterfly Gardens! Everyone enjoys learning about all of the beautiful butterflies and other creatures that live there. As the leaders supervise the group, the children are able to wander around the facility at their own pace. Some are mesmerized by the resident iguanas and flamingos while others are fascinated by the colours on the wings of the butterflies.

After awhile the children start to get hungry and it’s time to get back into the vehicles and head to a nearby park for lunch. The children are offered choices in their activities and on this afternoon they must choose between a hike in the forest, some structured games on the park’s field or free play on the playground. At 2:30, it’s time to head back to The Cridge as parents start to arrive shortly after 3. Once back at The Cridge, the children are offered a healthy snack – today it’s Ants on a Log (celery, cream cheese and raisins). They spend the rest of the afternoon either playing with the toys at the child care facility or enjoying our wonderful playground again until it’s time to go home. At The Cridge, we strive to be as inclusive as possible in all of our activities so that children of all abilities can participate and have fun.

Spring Break 2016 was filled with many highlights. This year we celebrated St Patrick’s Day by baking cookies and on our final day the Easter Bunny left us some treats. On other days we went hiking at Goldstream Park, saw a science show, played Bigger/Better (a trading game) at Mayfair Mall, enjoyed the playground at Gyro Beach and watched the Peanuts Movie at Cinecenta. One fun afternoon was spent styling each others’ hair at The Cridge using purple and blue (washable) hair gels and fancy elastics.

All of the fun activities during Spring Break 2016 have left everyone anticipating Sun Fun 2016.

The Real Superman: A Local Hero

by Greg Goldberg: Brain Injury Services Activity Facilitator

Images and song lyrics from my favorite childhood movie are sunk so deeply into my long term memory that I can still sing a memorable song verbatim when I am brave enough and the streets are empty. When Dandy Dan and his team of gangsters invaded Fat Sam’s Tavern and a magical gun fight ensues, with Bugsy Malone (Scott Baio) and Tallulah (Jodie Foster) in the midst of it all, the tune silenced the room, and the crowd performs a final number (“You Give a Little Love”). It was then that I fell in love with how the movies could transport you to such a happy place.

For myself and five of my clients, all survivors of head injury or stroke, we were all magically taken to an unexpected place that brought us tremendous happiness. Thanks to a very kind manager at a cinema in downtown Victoria we would discover the type of hero that the world really needs. My failure to properly de-crypt the data in the paper regarding showtimes had me embarrassed and fearful of my clients disappointment when we realized we had come at the wrong time. Instead of going into self-imposed exile, I admitted my error to the theatre manager who, with a most gleaming-like glow, gave us free admittance into one of the empty theaters. That afternoon five survivors of unfortunate life changing experiences watched, in all three dimensions, Superman vs Batman. In our own private theatre, Batman and Superman and a number of other comic super-hero figures came alive in the Battle of Justice.

The kindness of this manager makes him a super-hero in the eyes of all of us who experienced this considerate gesture. Leaving the theatre with smiling clients who were given the ‘red carpet
experience’ will now be another one of our long term memories. Who could ever forget meeting a real life super-hero in Victoria, BC? Thanks Pierre Gauthier! You are a real superman in our eyes!
YOU GIVE A LITTLE LOVE Lyrics (Bugsy Malone Movie 1976)
You give a little love
And it all comes back to you,
You know you gonna be remembered
For the things you say and do.

Youth Connection

by Candace Stretch

The Cridge Dovetail Program provides support to the women and children living in our Supportive Transitional Housing. All of these families have recently experienced violence, either at the hands of an abusive person living in their home or through political violence in their home country.

We are fortunate to have a wonderful team of skilled support workers who connect weekly with our tenants. Among the many individual and group activities that we offer our tenants, are programs for the children and youth living in Cridge housing. Susie, our Child and Youth Worker, has a special talent for bringing just the right combination of fun, compassion, and insight to her interactions with our kids.

Recently Susie established a youth group which meets every Thursday evening. She enlisted the help of Isha, another support worker in the Dovetail Program, to co-facilitate. The group is focused on helping these kids to find confidence, friendship, and a sense of belonging in our Cridge community. The group often hang out together here at The Cridge doing activities such as baking, art and video games. But they also love to get out and explore our city together.

Over the years, there have been many successful youth groups established in our Dovetail Program- but this group has been truly remarkable. From the minute they came together, this group of kids seemed to genuinely click. They couldn’t be a more diverse group of individuals- they represent many differences in personality, gender, skills and abilities, cultural background, language of origin, and life experience. But each has had the common experience of leaving violence and coming to The Cridge to seek safety. The group has become a close-knit circle of friends. Susie and Isha have witnessed each member contributing to the group, and taking steps to share their genuine self with each other.

It is a joy to witness the young people in our Cridge Dovetail community coming together in this special way. We are thankful to God!

CHEK News: Vital People

Last week we had the privilege of having Veronica Cooper from CHEK News visit us to film a piece for Vital People about Michael Cridge. Here is the link to view that clip:

Vital People: Michael Cridge

A story of plants, gratitude and being blessed.

Every now and then one of our supporters contacts us with a story of how their lives intersect with The Cridge Centre. We love hearing about how our family members are active in their communities and are also advocating for us and our programs.  Here is a story from Diane, a long term supporter and champion of The Cridge Centre and how she turned irritation into gratitude and a gift.

For years I have been putting my plants on the driveway for people to take away. Over the last years I have noticed that friends and neighbors are taking the plants when I am not around but they never say they have the plant, and they never express any appreciation. That disappoints me. About two weeks ago, a couple who I don’t know who live a block away, walked by when I was in the garden and the man commented that they have taken many “good” plants from me over the years. Then he said ”So when are you going to put out more for me”? He was not joking. Normally I would have said “I will dig up some plants for your right now” but something stopped me. On reflection, I realized I was angry at how people are taking the plants but not bothering to say thank you. Then I realized how much the Lord gives us — and how often do I forget to express my gratitude for his gifts? And how does the Lord feel when I just keep saying I want more. I knew I needed to change but didn’t know what to do next.

After a few days of reflection, I decided I would put my one chrysanthemum plant on Used Victoria…selling it for $5. I advertised that the funds would be donated to the Respite Care at The Cridge Centre. Within two hours a lady responded that she wanted it and could she come and get it right away. Of course I was motivated to dig up more. So every day or so someone comes by with their $5.00 and walks away delighted with their bargain plants. This has been going on for a week or more. A lady with a wholesale nursery took away a lot of my nerine bulbs. A young lady just left moments ago — she picked up some plants for her mum (they have both moved here from Manitoba). When I explained what The Cridge does, she pushed the change I had for her back into my hand and said  ”We like organizations like this – keep the money”. And she gave me a dahlia bulb as well! Tomorrow someone who lives in Vancouver is coming to get a plant. I am meeting many interesting people, sharing a love of gardening and raising money for a worthy cause… and being blessed at the same time. What a wonderful gift!

Thanks, Diane, for sharing your story! And thanks to so many of you who look for generous and creative ways to support The Cridge Centre — we are so grateful for you!

If you want to  support The Cridge Centre by selling things on Used Victoria, click here to get more information.

 

 

Michael Cridge

Michael Cridge — Caring Canadian and Cridge Champion

Can we be any prouder? If Bishop Cridge and his wife Mary were around, they would undoubtedly be busting their buttons with pride over their great great grandson who will be awarded the Governor General’s Caring Canadian Award. Michael has been a faithful supporter of The Cridge Centre for over 18 years, serving in a variety of capacities, including board member, president and treasurer. His passion and commitment have impacted lives and have continued to push The Cridge Centre forward as an organization striving for excellence in serving the Greater Victoria community. The Cridge legacy of faithful generosity and dedicated service to our community continues to live on in Michael and his family. We are so honoured and proud to have Michael as part of The Cridge Centre’s family.

The award ceremony will be at 2:30 on Friday March 4, 2016 in Vancouver and can be streamed live on www.gg.ca/live

 

 

Diabetes and Brain Injury

Diabetes is a challenging disease and not one that is commonly associated with brain injury. Brian Loof, previous resident of Macdonald House, lives with the daily impact of both diabetes and a brain injury.
Brian slipped into a diabetic coma and when he awoke from the coma, he was missing approximately 7 years of his memory. There were many challenges ahead of Brian so he came to Macdonald House to begin rebuilding his life.
Initially, the goal was to create a medically stable life for Brian and to provide him with a safe, nurturing home with 24-hour support. Brian also needed to establish healthy routines and work towards making positive changes in his life. Brian’s individual needs, abilities, and interests could be met within the scope of work done at Macdonald House.
While the team was confident that Brian could rebuild his life in a supported setting like Macdonald House, there was no anticipation that he would ever be able to live independently. However, after 7 years, Brian had not only redesigned his life, he was medically stable, working part-time, and ready to transition from Macdonald House to living independently with supports.
Brian, albeit with the new challenges of learning to budget his money, pay rent, and learning to cook and maintain an apartment, was able to move from Macdonald House into a new community where he continued to thrive. Today, after three years in an apartment with supports, Brian is now living in a market rent building that has no supports. He continues to receive minimal community support to monitor medications and to assist him with grocery shopping and attending appointments. He has maintained the same part-time job and has built meaningful connections with those he has met along the way.
This photo is of Brian playing with his support worker’s newborn baby.